yoshinori matsumoto is an artist.

Back in Kyoto to visit Ginkaku-ji again

Back in Kyoto to visit Ginkaku-ji again

What do you do when you have a free afternoon on beautiful day in Kyoto. You visit Ginkaku-ji again because you love its garden…

Ginkaku-ji - officially named Jishō-ji - is a Zen temple in the Sakyo ward of Kyoto, Japan. Ashikaga Yoshimasa initiated plans for creating a retirement villa and gardens as early as 1460; and after his death, Yoshimasa would arrange for this property to become a Zen temple. The temple is today associated with the Shokoku-ji branch of Rinzai Zen.

Ginkakuji was constructed in relation to its surroundings. This is described in the Journal of Asian Studies by Ichito Ishida and Delmer M. Brown, "The southeast corner of the first floor has openings in the walls, since a pond is located on that corner of the building, beyond which the moon rises between the peaks of Higashiyama. And since a lake extending northeastward reflected light that suffices even for reading, the room on the northeast corner has been planned as a library. Therefore the natural objects do not merely surround the building, twisting it out of shape but supply intrinsic motivation for the structural design." The sand garden of Ginkaku-ji has become particularly well known; and the carefully formed pile of sand which is said to symbolize Mount Fuji is an essential element in the garden.

Later on I went for a stroll along Philosopher’s Walk which is a pedestrian path that follows a cherry-tree-lined canal in Kyoto, between Ginkaku-ji and Nanzen-ji. The route is so-named because the influential 20th-century Japanese philosopher and Kyoto University professor Nishida Kitaro is thought to have used it for daily meditation.

 
Visiting Tōdai-ji Temple in Nara this morning

Visiting Tōdai-ji Temple in Nara this morning